Essential Oil Safety

Test your knowledge of essential oil safety based on research and evidence.

While essential oils are natural it doesn’t mean that they are inherently safe. Anything that has a therapeutic effect can also cause an unintended reaction. What determines whether you have a positive therapeutic result or unintended result is largely based on the exposure (dose and time) and method of use.

This short quiz is intended to help you discover a few of the reasonable cautions that should be followed to reduce the risk of an unintended result when using essential oils. To learn more and have a resource to guide you see one of Dr. Johnson’s books:

Which of the following essential oils contain enough 1,8-cineole to avoid use in children under the age of 3?


Which constituent in wintergreen is similar to aspirin making it important to avoid in children under age 12, particularly when feverish or sick with a viral illness?


Which of the following essential oils should be used cautiously or avoided when a person is taking an anticoagulant drug like warfarin?


This essential oil produces antidepressant effects via the monoamine oxidase (MAO) pathway, which suggests that it may interact with other antidepressants that work on the same MAO pathway.


Which of these essential oils has been shown in research to interact with antibiotics and antifungals?


What essential oil contains alantolactone, which is known to cause skin irritation when applied topically?


Which of these essential oils should be avoided or used very cautiously by people with epilepsy?


Which of these essential oils increases the risk of photosensitivity when applied topically and exposed to UV rays?


Which of the following essential oils may interact with caffeine?


Which book or books by Dr. Johnson contain(s) essential oils cautions and potential drug interactions?


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