Why Eating Better Temporarily Makes You Feel Worse

Eating whole and healthy foods does your body good. But if your body is used to refined and processed food, a transition to healthy foods can be difficult. Indeed, it isn’t uncommon to experience gastrointestinal symptoms and even vomiting during this transition. Discover why this occurs and how you can work to make your transition more bearable.

It begins at the cellular level

The surface of cells is full of receptors responsible for binding with signaling molecules and then transmitting those signals inside the cell. The signals that are received inside the cell determine the cell’s behavior. Whether a cell makes more or less of something, your overall health, and your risk of disease depends on this activity. Each signal triggers the formation of action plans that improve or harm your health.

So what exactly are these signaling molecules that regulate our health? Several molecules can interact with these receptors and their influence on cellular behavior and overall health is largely determined by how many of these molecules are present in your blood.

Some molecules can produce positive results:

  • Nutrients — vitamins, minerals, amino acids, fatty acids, etc. — from whole foods
  • Hormones
  • Neurotransmitters
  • Dietary supplements

Other molecules are not as good for us and can produce harmful results:

  • Drugs
  • Synthetic food additives (MSG, aspartame, trans fats, sodium nitrite, etc.)
  • Nicotine
  • Excess sugar, alcohol, or caffeine

Stress also triggers the release of signaling molecules (cortisol, adrenaline, etc.) that can adversely affect the way you feel. The reality is, your cells continually make decisions based on the signaling molecules that are available in the blood. If your cells are constantly bombarded with rubbish, you will quickly feel like rubbish yourself.

Cellular adaptations

Your body was masterfully designed to adapt to a variety of situations. It relentlessly strives to maintain balance and homeostasis regardless of what is thrown at it. However, we can reduce the body’s workload and make it easier to thrive by a few simple healthy behaviors. Your body’s initial reaction the first time you bombard your cells with greasy, fried food, sugar-laden soda, and empty refined carbohydrates may be severe. Your cells gradually adapt to these signaling molecules and adopt them as the “norm.” Eventually, the severe responses also stop.

Indeed, your cells and body may actually feel “good” or pleasure in response adopting this new norm of negative signaling molecules. That is until you remove the pleasurable signaling molecules or introduce positive signaling molecules. Just like your cell receptors adapted to the dysfunctional regimen, they need to adapt again if you change to healthier options.

Your body has the same response to the new signaling molecules — whether reducing what it was used to or introducing healthier molecules — the same way it initially did to the bad signaling molecules. This change of available signaling molecules feels bad at first, even though it is a positive change to reduce the availability of bad molecules and increase the healthy molecules.

You will continue to feel bad — digestive discomfort, nausea, headache, mood swings, low energy — until your body adapts to the new normal. How long this process of adaptation takes depends on your current state of health, lifestyle factors, stress levels, genetics, and nutritional status, but on average it takes from 3 to 7 days.

Dopamine withdrawal

Another factor that can leave you feeling sluggish, moody, and even anxious when changing what you eat, is modifications in dopamine levels. Foods loaded with sugar, fat, and salt trigger the release of dopamine (a “feel-good” neurotransmitter) that activate the brain’s reward center. This is one reason why eating highly processed foods is so enjoyable. However, when you remove these dopamine-triggering foods, you can experience withdrawal symptoms.

Changes in gut flora (the microbiome)

In addition to adapting to changes in signaling molecules, your gut microbiome (balance of healthy to unhealthy bacteria) rapidly changes in response to what you eat. Recent research reveals that the gut microbiome begins to change within hours and dramatically changes within three to four days after switching what you eat. (1) In other words, what you eat feeds different types of bacteria.

This is one reason that adding prebiotic foods (chicory root, artichokes, dandelion greens, raw onions or garlic, etc.) or high-fiber foods like beans and lentils can increase in gas and bloating. If your body isn’t used to these foods, the gut microbiome undergoes a significant transformation due to the feeding of different sets of bacteria. The result is a few to several days of excess gas until the new normal gut microbiome is fully established and accepted.

Too much sugar, saturated fat, and not enough fiber can alter the gut microbiome enough to trigger immune and inflammatory responses and increase the risk of inflammatory bowel disease. (2) Other studies suggest that your gut microbiome impacts your risk of allergy, asthma, and arthritis. (3) These modifications to the gut microbiome also increase the risk of digestive discomfort such as diarrhea, nausea, and bloating. (4) The overwhelming evidence suggests that we need to provide our gut foods that feed healthy bacteria and even supplement with a good probiotic to maintain overall health.

Toxins released during dietary changes

Changes in eating patterns, particularly those that result in weight loss, releases toxins from fat stores and into the blood. The body preferentially stores toxins in fat tissues rather than vital nervous and muscle tissues. During weight loss, fat breaks down and toxins are discharged into the bloodstream. An increase in oxidative stress — an imbalance in reactive oxygen species and the body’s ability to neutralize them — may occur as a result of a large number of toxins in the blood.

Oxidative stress increases the production of free radical and peroxides that damage cells and disrupts cellular signaling. Indeed, a host of diseases (cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, kidney disease, eye diseases, and abnormal fetal development) are linked to oxidative stress as well as the aging process. Symptoms of oxidative stress include fatigue, muscle or joint pain, headache, and brain fog.

Recent research suggests that eating smaller frequent meals (4-6 daily) with 20 to 25 grams of protein at each meal may help the body deal with this release of stored toxins. This eating pattern, called Protein-Pacing Caloric Restrictive Diet reduces calories (1,200 to 1,500 calories daily) to promote weight loss but also aids the bodies normal detoxification processes. Other solutions to reduce a toxic attack on cells is to drink plenty of water to flush them out, get sufficient antioxidants from your food, and use essential oils that aid normal detoxification processes (lavender, frankincense, Eucalyptus radiata).

The difference between an allergy, intolerance, sensitivity and an adjustment

Some people may experience an allergy, food sensitivity, or food intolerance rather than an adjustment. Food allergies occur when your immune system overreacts to a food or substance in a food. It is estimated that up to 8% of children and about 3% of adults are affected by food allergies.

When an allergy occurs, the food or substance is identified by the immune system as a threat, which triggers a protective response. Eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, shellfish, and fish account for approximately 90% of all food allergies. Allergies affect multiple organs in the body and cause a wide range of symptoms. The most common signs and symptoms of a food allergy include: skin reactions (hives, eczema, itching), tingling or itching in the mouth, respiratory trouble (difficulty breathing, wheezing, nasal congestion, repetitive cough), pale or blue coloring of the skin, swelling of the lips, tongue, throat, or face, dizziness, and gastrointestinal problems (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain).

Food sensitivities and intolerances are more common than food allergies. Food sensitivities trigger the release of chemical mediators (like histamine) into the blood causing a delayed and less obvious reaction to the food. They may take days to occur and can involve the skin and respiratory system just like allergies. The primary difference between an allergy and sensitivity is the time it takes to occur. Allergies appear within minutes to as long as two hours, whereas sensitivities generally take days for a reaction to occur.

Unlike allergies, food intolerances don’t involve the immune system. Instead, your body is unable to properly digest the particular food. They may occur due to insufficient digestive enzyme production, chronic stress that causes sluggish digestion, or an overreaction to a food additive (MSG). Depending on the type of food intolerance, people may be able to eat small amounts of the problem foods without a reaction. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea or constipation, gas, bloating, and abdominal pain. Food intolerances are generally less severe than allergies and limited to the digestive system.

The gastrointestinal system is affected in a similar way by adjustments, allergies, intolerance, and sensitivities. Unfortunately, adjustments can mimic allergies in some ways beyond digestive problems. The general fatigue and headaches, and mood swings may make people think they have a food allergy. It is important to distinguish allergies, food sensitivities, food intolerances, and adjustments because there are common symptoms and a severe allergy can be life-threatening.

Rapid reactions that involve the skin and respiratory system following the consumption of a food or substance are likely allergic reactions. If you experience chronic respiratory symptoms (runny nose), long-lasting skin issues (eczema), frequent headaches, or poor appetite it suggests a food sensitivity. Food intolerance is almost always isolated to digestive problems. Food intolerance symptoms generally occur fairly quickly and when many foods or enough of the problem food is consumed.

How to make transitions to healthier foods more bearable

  • Ease into it. You wouldn’t try a 180-degree direction change in your vehicle at 70 miles per hour, so why would you do this with what you eat? Your body will adapt better if you slowly introduce healthy foods and gradually eliminate unhealthy foods. Try to eliminate one unhealthy food or add one healthy food for 4 to 7 days before making the next change.
  • Eat whole foods. Whole and real foods are the best signaling molecules for your body. These foods contain vitamins, minerals, and other vital nutrients that your body readily recognizes and can use to function optimally. Real foods with fiber and protein are particularly important for breakfast so your cells begin the day with the right nutrition and signaling molecules.
  • Eat frequent smaller meals. Eat the same amount of calories — or fewer if you’ve been eating an excess amount — but in more frequent smaller meals. Don’t let more than three hours pass without having a meal or snack. This helps to control blood sugar levels, maintain energy levels, and improve mood.
  • Stay hydrated. The majority of your body is composed of water and it is essential to convert food into energy and helps your body absorb nutrients. Drinking enough water is essential to carry out wastes and toxins produced during metabolism. In addition, optimal hydration supports body weight goals by triggering the release of fat for energy and producing a feeling of fullness. (5) Water should be the primary beverage you consume.

Conclusion

Nutritional transitions aren’t always easy but the temporary discomforts are well worth the vast health benefits you will realize. Stick to it and focus on the benefits you’ll see on the other side. Your body, mind, emotions, and spirit will thank you — eventually.

The Best Type of Protein for Your Health

Protein is vital to the function of all cells. It serves to build and repair tissues, speed chemical reactions, provide energy, and acts as a hormone. Life would cease to exist without protein, making it essential that we consume sufficient quantities daily. But, with all of the protein powder options, which is the best for your health?

What is protein?

Proteins are complex compounds composed of linear chains of amino acids (called peptides). There are twenty common amino acids: alanine, arginine, asparagine, cysteine, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and valine. Of these twenty common amino acids, nine are essential (histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine), meaning we must obtain them through what we eat and drink. Complete proteins contain good levels of all nine essential amino acid.

How much protein do you need?

This depends on a few factors. Protein requirements change due to activity level, age, and current state of health.  Protein needs are also greater among the chronically stressed or during acute infections or illness. As a general rule, healthy adults should consume about 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram (about 0.36 grams per pound) of body weight to prevent a deficiency. Active individuals may require 1.4–2.0 grams per kilogram (0.64–0.9 grams per pound) to optimize protein synthesis.

Protein synthesis is the process cells use to create new proteins to replenish those lost during normal metabolic function. This is the process muscles use to grow and it will not occur properly without optimum amino acid levels. Interestingly, evidence suggests that taking protein prior to strength training is more effective to stimulate protein synthesis than taking it afterward. (18) The same research also concluded that a fast-acting carbohydrate source (glucose or maltodextrin) that triggers insulin release is essential for leucine to modulate protein synthesis. Ideally, a person would take some protein before and after strength training.

Amino acid profiles of common proteins

 

 

Essential Amino Acid

Complete Protein Requirement1

mg/g protein

Whey Concentrate2,3

mg/g protein

 

Whey Isolate5

mg/g protein

 

Moringa Leaf6

mg/g protein

 

Pea Isolate7

mg/g protein

Tryptophan 7 17.3 18.9 21.6 7
Threonine 27 61.1–68.7 79.1 40.7 28
Isoleucine 25 49.7–57.3 56.0 58.7 37
Leucine 55 79.8–106.6 102.4 83.8 64
Lysine 51 76.1–88.1 97.0 58.7 57
Methionine + Cysteine 25 79.7 37.8 32.7 16
Phenylalanine + Tyrosine 47 58.2 52.6 94.5 73
Valine 32 18.4–59.3 58.8 39 40
Histidine 18 7.8–18.7 13.1 25.8 19

 

 

 

Essential Amino Acid

 

Rice Isolate8

mg/g protein

 

Egg9

mg/g protein

Casein Hydrolysate10

mg/g protein

 

Hemp Seed11

mg/g protein

 

Soy Isolate12

mg/g protein

Tryptophan 11.5–11.7 17 9.6–11.2 Not determined 32.2
Threonine 28.6–29.2 47 40.5–42.5 39.8–45.7 31.4
Isoleucine 32.3–34.7 54 41.0–47.5 30.9–43.5 42.5
Leucine 63.2–64.1 86 85.0–89.2 61.7–67.9 67.8
Lysine 21.9–24.2 70 74.4–79.6 33.2–52.3 53.3
Methionine + Cysteine 39.6–40.8 57 30.3–32.3 9.7–25.8 21.7
Phenylalanine + Tyrosine 85.6–86.7 93 90.6–102.1 69.8–88.1 78.2
Valine 42.6–45.6 66 49.7–56.4 42.6–49.8 41.0
Histidine 16.7–18.2 22 24.1–25.4 28.1–33.1 23.0

What is the best protein for health?

This is a common question that doesn’t have a singular answer. The answer depends on what benefits you are seeking. If you simply want more protein in your diet, or a source of calories, just about any protein will work. But if you want the protein for a specific purpose (increase lean muscle mass, appetite control, etc.) your choice of protein will matter more. In addition, vegetarians would want to avoid proteins from animal products, soy is best avoided due to GMO concerns, and individuals who are lactose intolerant would want to steer clear of whey protein concentrates (due to the lactose content). Let’s explore some of the most common protein supplements available.

Whey protein

Often considered the “gold standard” of proteins, whey is a complete protein with good levels of each of the essential amino acids and excellent digestibility. It is one of two proteins found in milk and accounts for about 20% of milk protein, the other 80% being casein. Whey is a byproduct of cheese production. Whey protein concentrate is leftover after the water and casein are removed. Whey protein concentrate has a protein content of about 80%. Whey protein seems to stimulate protein synthesis better than casein and soy protein. (20)

Whey protein isolate undergoes further processing (cross-flow micro-filtration) that separates the fat, cholesterol, and lactose providing a purer end product with about 90% protein content. Whey protein isolate also has fewer calories than whey protein concentrate. It is also more expensive.

Whey protein isolate can also be hydrolyzed – partially digested with enzymes – to create whey protein hydrolysate (WPH). This shortens the protein chains (peptides) and increases the digestion and absorption rate of WPH. It is rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream, may reduce appetite.

Some experience digestive disturbances (bloating, gas, diarrhea, and stomach cramps) from whey protein. This can be caused by lactose intolerance or sensitivity or a sensitivity to whey protein.

Moringa leaf protein

The most nutrient dense botanical discovered, moringa delivers a wide variety of nutrients to the body, including protein. Indeed, gram for gram it provides about nine times more protein than yogurt. (6) However, its protein hasn’t been available commercially as a supplement until recently. Moringa leaf protein compares favorably to amino acid profiles recommended for adults and children by the World Health Organization. (13) It can be considered a complete protein because it contains all of the essential amino acids.

Pea protein

With the exception of methionine + cysteine, pea protein contains good levels of all nine essential amino acids. It is often combined with rice protein to improve its amino acid profile. It is a good option for those seeking a gluten and dairy free protein supplement. Research suggests that pea protein equals casein and surpasses whey protein in its ability to curb appetite. (14) Similarly, pea protein matched whey protein in promoting increased muscle thickness after strength training. (15) Combined pea and rice protein powders are an attractive plant-based option for protein supplements.

Rice protein

Rice protein is rich in all nine essential amino acids and can be considered a complete protein. Rice protein (48 g daily) produced comparable results in body composition (lean body mass, muscle mass, fat mass) and athletic performance (strength, power) when compared to whey protein isolate (48 g daily). (16) It is generally more tolerable for those who experience digestive upset with whey proteins.

Egg protein

Egg protein has good digestibility and is rich in BCAAs. It is a complete protein with good biological value at lower levels (about 14 grams daily). The high protein value of eggs makes them a standard by which others foods are measured. Noteworthy is the fact that recent research observed that whole eggs improved protein synthesis 40% greater than egg whites alone. (17) Most egg protein supplements isolate the egg white, pulverize and dry it, then turn it into a powder. Some include the egg yolk, which are preferred considering the findings of recent research.

Casein protein

The majority of milk protein is casein. This slower digesting protein provides a sustained release of amino acids. It is created by dehydrating milk, which can denature the product and lead to health issues. Another concern with casein is whether it is A2 beta-casein (naturally produced by animals for thousands of years) or A1 beta-casein (a protein that developed after domestication of animals). A1 casein is prone to causing digestive issues, promotes inflammation, and negatively affects cognition. (19) It is extremely high in glutamine – the primary amino acid in the muscles.

Hemp seed protein

Hemp protein is a byproduct of hempseed oil production. After extracting the oil, the hemp seedmeal is processed into hemp protein supplements. It contains a variety of amino acids, including all nine essential oil amino acids, but it is typically lower in lysine, leucine, and tryptophan. (21) Its digestibility is above average when dehulled seeds are used, but slightly below the reference protein (casein) if not dehulled. (21) Hemp protein has the added benefit of being rich in fiber, which helps maintain bowel regularity.

Bone broth protein

Probably one of the hottest health trends today, bone broth consumption is experiencing a remarkable revival. Bone broth protein is produced by dehydrating bone broth (usually from chicken bones). It is promoted as producing a wide range of health benefits, including reduced inflammation, improved mood, and enhanced immune function. However, clinical data to support these claims is lacking thus far and bone broth supplements may be contaminated with lead (which is known to accumulate in the bones). (26) Chicken bones contain all of the essential amino acids – although the exact amino acid profile is unknown – and type I and type II collagen (which are essential for healthy connective tissue and cartilage).

Soy protein

Soy is currently the most widely used vegetable protein source. It is considered a high-quality protein due to its amino acid profile – contains good levels of all nine essential amino acids and a high concentration of BCAAs. However, concerns over its genetic modification and phytoestrogen load have led many consumers to abandon it is a supplement. A number of health benefits have been attributed to soy protein’s active components (phytosterols, saponins, and isoflavones). (22) I personally would recommend avoiding soy protein.

Recommendations for specific uses

  • General nutrition: Moringa leaf protein, rice protein, pea protein, or hemp seed protein; combination of any of these four plant-based proteins are even better
  • Weight loss: Whey protein hydrolysate (23) or whey protein isolate (24)
  • Muscle growth: Whey protein hydrolysate preferably immediately before or within 30 minutes following strength training; combined pea and rice proteins are a good plant-based alternative
  • Post-exercise recovery: 5 grams of BCAAs (leucine, isoleucine, valine in a 2:1:1 ratio; 3g leucine, 1g isoleucine, 1g valine) and 5 grams of glutamine; or whey protein isolate, concentrate, or hydrolysate with glutamine
  • Appetite control: Pea protein (14)
  • Muscle preservation in old age: Whey protein concentrate or isolate (25); a combination of moringa, pea, and rice protein is a good plant-based option

Conclusion

Several of the protein options have benefits and scientific support. The best protein really depends on your desired use and results. Since each of us is biologically unique, you may need to experiment and determine what your body needs most. Most importantly, make sure you give your body adequate protein to thrive each day.

Ten essential oils to ignite passion and enhance intimacy

Looking to ignite passion and enhance intimacy? Lost enjoyment in sex or struggling with that illusive and mystical (some would say mythical) libido? No worries, essential oils may be just what the libido ordered. Throughout history, essential oils have been used to encourage cuddling, affection, and intimacy. This blog intends to explore ten oils that can enhance the passion in your bedroom and life.

Known as the sex drive, libido influences a person’s overall desire for sexual activity. Libido is a regulated by a complex interaction between hormones and neurotransmitters (chemical communicators of the brain like dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, GABA) released by the brain—specifically the limbic system and amygdala. Dopamine regulates desire, acetylcholine initiates arousal, GABA is necessary for orgasm, and serotonin is the final phase of libido called resolution.

To say that libido is all in your head is mostly accurate. Neurotransmitters released by the brain do the heavy lifting, governing a healthy libido. Estrogen is the primary hormone driving libido in women during the most fertile days. In menstruating females, libido peaks just prior to ovulation—a built-in motivation that encourages sexual intercourse during the most fertile days of the cycle and ensures the survival of the human race.

However, those revved-up days in the cycle virtually vanish as the production of key hormones—that are intimately connected to neurotransmitters—diminish during menopause. Indeed, hormones and neurotransmitters are interconnected in a complex dance (estrogen to serotonin, progesterone to GABA, and so forth) must maintain a specific rhythm throughout the life of a woman to sustain a healthy libido. The result of losing this rhythm and optimal production of both hormones and neurotransmitters is decreased libido, and reduced blood flow to the vagina, which causes vaginal dryness and decreased pleasure. Less pleasure, discomfort, and a decreased libido causes some women to experience a less fulfilling sex life during their mature years.

The male libido resides in the cerebral cortex and limbic areas of the brain and is fueled by neurotransmitters and testosterone. When a male becomes aroused, signals are sent from the cerebral cortex along nerves that elevate heart rate and increase blood flow to the genitals. Just like women, testosterone production changes over the course of a man’s lifetime. It usually peaks in his late teens and slowly declines thereafter. As a man ages, neurotransmitter, hormonal, and vascular changes make greater physical stimulation required to maintain sexual function and pleasure.

Keep in mind that although hormones and brain chemicals regulate libido, it is significantly influenced by emotions and stress levels. For example, you may be showering with the love of your life and feel desire, but arousal only occurs if you feel emotionally balanced and have stress under control. This may be why essential oils are so well-equipped to influence libido—because they profoundly influence mood and emotions by interacting with the same areas of the brain that regulate libido.

Ylang ylang is prized for its positive effects on blood pressure, stress levels, self-confidence, mood, and libido. Its flowers are traditionally placed on a couple’s bed on their wedding night. By relaxing both the mind and body, it places individuals in the right state for intimacy should the desire arise. In addition, its positive effects on blood pressure may increase blood flow to the genitals to make intercourse more enjoyable. How to use: Diffuse 7 to 10 drops in your diffuser 15 minutes prior to and during intimacy; or dilute and apply 1 to 2 drops over the heart.

Sandalwood is employed as a potent aphrodisiac in India. It too is calming to the mind and combats the negative emotions and stress that can interfere with intimacy. Interestingly, sandalwood reportedly smells similar to androsterone (a metabolite of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone), which may trigger subtle sensual signals to the opposite sex. How to use: Diffuse 7 to 10 drops in your diffuser 15 minutes prior to and during intimacy; or dilute and apply 1 drop to the side of the neck.

Patchouli essential oil is used in aromatherapy to reduce tension, stress, and anxiety. It has been used traditionally in Asian cultures as an aphrodisiac. Some experts believe that patchouli stimulates the sex glands to increase both libido and sexual responses. How to use: Diffuse 5 drops in your diffuser 15 minutes prior to and during intimacy, or dilute and apply to the lower abdomen.

Deeply relaxing and producing euphoric feelings, clary sage is a powerful aphrodisiac. It contains trace to small amounts of sclareol, which is a compound structurally similar to estrogen. It has a long history of use for balancing female energies and supporting normal hormone function in women. Clary sage also influences dopamine activity, which helps regulate sexual desire. How to use: Dilute and apply to the lower abdomen area and inside ankle area; or take 2 to 3 drops in an empty capsule and consume daily.

With an earthy aroma, vetiver essential oil is used in the traditions of Ayurveda to increase libido. It positively influences genes associated with both male and female hormone function. Its calming aroma reduces stress, which is vital for sexual health and enjoyment. Moreover, vetiver is known to increase GABA levels in the brain, which may enhance orgasm. How to use: Take 2 to 3 drops in a capsule daily.

Prized for its balancing effects to mood and uplifting aroma, bergamot is known to support optimal levels of acetylcholine in the brain. Optimal acetylcholine levels lead to enhanced sexual arousal. In addition, bergamot positively influences genes related to male and female hormone function. With less stress, improved mood, and optimum acetylcholine and hormone function, you can’t go wrong with bergamot during intimacy. How to use: Diffuse 7-10 in your diffuser 15 minutes prior to and during intimacy, or take 2 to 3 drops in a capsule daily.

Neroli essential oil is a great option for menopausal women according to clinical research. Women who inhaled a 0.5% dilution of neroli oil experienced improved sexual desire, quality of life, estrogen levels, cortisol levels, and menopausal symptoms. It has an alluring aroma that triggers desire in men and women both. How to use: Diffuse 5 drops in your diffuser 15 minutes prior to and during intimacy, or dilute and massage to the shoulders.

More than just a food spice, nutmeg essential oil is known for its psychoactive properties, including stress management and reduction of anxiety. It has also been traditionally used as an aphrodisiac and to improve sexual function. How to use: Diffuse 3 to 5 drops in your diffuser 15 minutes prior to and during intimacy.

Fennel has a licorice-like aroma that is relaxing and promotes self-confidence. Interestingly, fennel was used by the Egyptians to improve female libido and fennel decoctions were consumed by old men to improve virility anciently. How to use: Diffuse 5 drops in your diffuser 15 minutes prior to and during intimacy, or take 2 drops in an empty capsule the day of intimacy.

Several reports from women suggest that peppermint oil enhances sexual experience and orgasm. Peppermint increases focus, which is especially helpful for women who have trouble focusing during intimacy. The most common way it is used is by mixing 1 drop with about 7–10 mL of carrier oil and using it as a lubricant during intercourse. Other reports suggest applying it to the inner thighs is helpful.

Using two or more of the above essential oils together may amplify the benefits. Some find that combining three or more of the above oils into a roller bottle with carrier oil makes it easy to apply and readily available when the moment is right. Another frequent area to apply this type of blend is on the inner thighs.

Enhance intimacy and sensuality in the bedroom and your life with these tips. Used regularly, a night of passion with essential oils may become a more regular occurrence for you and your special someone.

Reference: Medicinal Essential Oils: The Science and Practice of Evidence-Based Essential Oil Therapy.