Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy (effective June 29, 2016)

Protecting your private information is our priority. This Statement of Privacy applies to the Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC, its websites authorscott.com, aromaticdatabase.com, and mobile app Evidence-Based Essential Oil Resource and governs data collection and usage. For the purposes of this Privacy Policy, unless otherwise noted, all references to Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC include Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC, aromaticdatabase.com, authorscott.com, and Evidence-Based Essential Oil Resource. The Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC website is a Natural Health & Essential Oil Education site. By using the Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC website, you consent to the data practices described in this statement.

Collection of your Personal Information
Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC may collect personally identifiable information, such as your name. If you purchase Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC’s products and services, we collect billing and credit card information. This information is used to complete the purchase transaction. We may gather additional personal or non-personal information in the future.

Information about your computer hardware and software may be automatically collected by Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC. This information can include: your IP address, browser type, domain names, access times and referring website addresses. This information is used for the operation of the service, to maintain quality of the service, and to provide general statistics regarding use of the Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC website.

Please keep in mind that if you directly disclose personally identifiable information or personally sensitive data through Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC’s public message boards, this information may be collected and used by others.

Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC encourages you to review the privacy statements of websites you choose to link to from Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC so that you can understand how those websites collect, use and share your information.

Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC is not responsible for the privacy statements or other content on websites outside of the Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC website.

Use of your Personal Information
Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC collects and uses your personal information to operate its website(s) and deliver the services you have requested.

Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC may also use your personally identifiable information to inform you of other products or services available from Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC and its affiliates. Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC may also contact you via surveys to conduct research about your opinion of current services or of potential new services that may be offered.

Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC does not sell, rent or lease its customer lists to third parties.

Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC may share data with trusted partners to help perform statistical analysis, send you email or postal mail, provide customer support, or arrange for deliveries. All such third parties are prohibited from using your personal information except to provide these services to Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC, and they are required to maintain the confidentiality of your information.

Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC will disclose your personal information, without notice, only if required to do so by law or in the good faith belief that such action is necessary to: (a) conform to the edicts of the law or comply with legal process served on Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC or the site; (b) protect and defend the rights or property of Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC; and, (c) act under exigent circumstances to protect the personal safety of users of Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC, or the public.

Security of your Personal Information
Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC secures your personal information from unauthorized access, use or disclosure. When personal information (such as a credit card number) is transmitted to other websites, it is protected through the use of encryption, such as the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol.

Children Under Thirteen
Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC does not knowingly collect personally identifiable information from children under the age of thirteen. If you are under the age of thirteen, you must ask your parent or guardian for permission to use this website.

Opt-Out & Unsubscribe
We respect your privacy and give you an opportunity to opt-out of receiving announcements of certain information. Users may opt-out of receiving any or all communications from Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC by contacting us here:

–  http://authorscott.com/contact/

Changes to this Statement
Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC will occasionally update this Statement of Privacy to reflect company and customer feedback. Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC encourages you to periodically review this Statement to be informed of how Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC is protecting your information.

Contact Information
Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC welcomes your questions or comments regarding this Statement of Privacy. If you believe that Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC has not adhered to this Statement, please contact Scott A Johnson Professional Writing Services, LLC here.

Effective as of June 29, 2016

DIY essential oil bleach alternative

Chlorine bleach is one of the most common chemicals found in homes, but it is also one of the most corrosive and dangerous materials we regularly expose ourselves to. And our children suffer the most from its toxic effects because of their smaller size.

The dangers of bleach include:

  • Respiratory problems (including an increased risk of infections in children)
  • Skin burns
  • Sensory irritation
  • Headache or migraine
  • Asthma flares
  • Damage to the nervous system
  • Vomiting
  • Creates a deadly gas when mixed with ammonia (in fact, mixing chlorine with dish soap can create deadly mustard gas used in chemical warfare)
  • Damage to the mucous membranes of the digestive tract
  • and much, much more

Don’t expose your family to chlorine bleach! Use a safe alternative made from just six ingredients found in Synergy, It’s an Essential Oil Thing.

3D-SynergyIngredients:

  1. Enough distilled water to fill half-gallon jug (after all other ingredients are added)
  2. 1.5 cups 3% hydrogen peroxide
  3. ½ cup lemon juice
  4. 1 tablespoon citric acid
  5. 20 drops of lemon essential oil
  6. 10 drops of thyme essential oil

Instructions: Add all ingredients except water to half gallon glass jug. Fill the remainder of the jug with distilled water. Shake well and use as you would regular bleach.

The scientifically proven benefits of laughter

Laughter may truly be the best medicine!

You may wonder why this post is under the category Move and Move Often, but laughter actually exercises several muscles of the body, including your face muscles, abdomen, shoulders, and back.

An excerpt from The Doctor’s Guide to Surviving When Modern Medicine Fails: The Ultimate Natural Medicine Guide to Preventing Disease and Living Longer:

“Laughter is the best medicine” is more than a catchy phrase. Laughter has both psychological and physiological effects on the body that can lead to dynamic psycho-physiological changes. Learning to laugh makes life more enjoyable. Laughing is contagious. It is almost impossible not to laugh and smile when you hear the raucous giggle of an infant. You may have a smile on your face right now with just the thought of it.

Psychologically, laughter helps eliminate anxious, angry, and gloomy emotions. It reduces stress and promotes a sense of relaxation. Laughter is a coping mechanism and strategy with the ability to promote confidence and create a feeling of optimism in difficult situations.

Laughter alleviates pain and discomfort. The subsequent surge of endorphins during a good laughing episode is like receiving a temporary morphine shot, and a study suggested that laughter actually increases your pain tolerance.562 Endorphins not only naturally relieve pain, they promote an overall sense of well-being and euphoria. Remarkably, one study concluded that just the mere anticipation of a good laugh releases not only endorphins, but human growth hormone.563 A good hardy laugh may also relieve tension by encouraging the muscles to relax.

Laughter enhances blood f low and improves the circulation of oxygen to tissues. A study conducted by the University of Maryland illustrated that laughter causes the inner lining of blood vessels, called the endothelium, to relax, expanding blood vessels and increasing blood f low.564 This suggests that laughter is actually beneficial to the heart and brain because they require a continual f low of oxygen from the blood.
Laughter may stimulate immune system activity. Some research indicates laughter may raise antibody activity and reduce levels of stress hormones.565,566 Norman Cousins famously battled his destructive disease, ankylosing spondylitis, with laughter and high doses of vitamin C. He contended that a good belly laugh provided him with two hours of pain free sleep. Amazingly he actually recovered from his illness reportedly through mega-doses of vitamin C, laughter, and a positive attitude.

Laughter appears to have social benefits as well. Laughter is so contagious that when you hear laughter your brain is primed and prepared to laugh. Laughter positively affects relationships and can help two people grow closer together. Laughing together can forge a connecting link and bond. Finally, laughter is attractive, with a tendency to draw others in.
Research has also demonstrated the ability of laughing to reduce blood glucose levels following the consumption of a meal.567 This makes laughter a supportive therapy for diabetics. Another reported benefit of laughter for diabetics is a possible reduction in the risk of heart disease—something diabetics have an elevated risk of. One study demonstrated the ability of laughter to reduce blood vessel inflammation and increase HDL cholesterol, thus lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease among diabetics.568

DIY Essential Oil Foaming Hand Soap

Ingredients:

  • 5 ounces water
  • 2 tablespoons liquid castile soap
  • 2 tablespoons aloe vera juice
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable glycerin
  • 5-10 drops of essential oils 

Instructions: Fill an empty foaming soap dispenser with 5 ounces of water. Then add the other ingredients in the order listed and shake vigorously. Use each time hands are washed.

For more essential oil recipes like this, see Synergy, It’s an Essential Oil Thing.

Dark chocolate boosts athletic performance and endurance

Dark chocolate has quickly earned a reputation as a superfood with vast human health benefits. Scientists continue to reveal the vast benefits of dark chocolate, including supporting cardiovascular health, providing powerful antioxidants to combat free radical damage, and enhancing brain function. On April 19, 2016, scientists at London’s Kingston University announced an impressive reason for athletes to also celebrate and eat dark chocolate — eating it enhances athletic performance and endurance.

Dark chocolate (chocolate with 70% or more cacao content) is highly nutritious, providing such valuable nutrients as fiber, fatty acids, iron, magnesium, copper, and manganese. In addition, dark chocolate is loaded with antioxidants like polyphenols, flavanols, and catechins; and combats free radicals better than other superfoods such as acai berries.(1)

Now, the caveat is dark chocolate is also high in calories — a whopping 600 calories per 100 grams — and contains about six teaspoons of sugar in the same serving, so only small amounts should be consumed on a regular basis. A reasonable daily amount to consume may be 30 to 50 g daily, aiming for 85% cacao content.

Evidence demonstrates that dark chocolate relaxes the arteries to allow blood to flow more freely and mildly lowers blood pressure.(2) In addition, dark chocolate favorably affects cholesterol levels—decreasing LDL cholesterol and oxidized cholesterol while simultaneously increasing HDL cholesterol.(3) These two benefits may contribute to an overall decrease in cardiovascular disease risk. Indeed, research suggests eating dark chocolate most days of the week decreases the risk of cardiovascular disease by 57%.(4)

Adding to the mounting body of evidence that dark chocolate is a beneficial superfood, scientists at London’s Kingston University suggest that dark chocolate may give athletes and weekend warriors an edge to achieve their fitness goals. The team of researchers led by Rishikesh Kanesh Patel sought to investigate whether epicatechin — a flavanol found in dark chocolate known to increase nitric oxide production in the body — could enhance athletic performance similarly to beetroot juice.

Beet root juice contains nitrates that the body converts to nitric oxide. Nitric oxide dilates the blood vessels and reduces the consumption of oxygen, allowing athletes to work harder and longer. The benefits of increased nitric oxide production particularly improve endurance.

The study authors evaluated the physical fitness of nine amateur cyclists at the beginning of the study. The nine cyclists were divided into two groups. The first group consumed 40 grams of dark chocolate daily for two weeks, whereas the control group consumed 40 grams of white chocolate instead. White chocolate has a much lower cocoa content and therefore fewer epicatechins.

At the end of the two weeks, the cyclists’ physical fitness — heart rate and oxygen consumption — were measured during moderate exercise and time trials. After a seven-day break, the two groups swapped chocolate types and the two-week trial and physical fitness performance measures were repeated.

What the researchers found was that when the groups consumed dark chocolate they had better overall physical fitness. The cyclists’ who consumed dark chocolate used less oxygen and were able to cover more distance during the time trials.

The study requires further larger and controlled studies to confirm the findings but suggests that eating 40 grams of dark chocolate daily could boost athletic performance — particularly among endurance athletes. Mr. Patel is currently conducting further research as part of his doctoral thesis and plans to test dark chocolate against beetroot juice as part of a comparative study.

(1) Crozier SJ, Preston AG, Hurst JW, et al. Cacao seeds are a “Super Fruit”: A comparative analysis of various fruit powders and products. Chem Cent J. 2011 Feb 7;5:5.

(2) Sudarma V, Sukmaniah S, Siregar P. Effect of dark chocolate on nitric oxide serum levels and blood pressure in prehypertension subjects. Acta Med Indones. 2011 Oct;43(4):224-8.

(3) Baba S, Natsume M, Yasuda A, et al. Plasma LDL and HDL Cholesterol and Oxidized LDL Concentrations Are Altered in Normo- and Hypercholesterolemic Humans after Intake of Different Levels of Cocoa Powder. J Nutr. 2007 Jun;137(6):1436-41.

(4) Djousse L, Hopkins PN, North KE, et al. Chocolate Consumption is Inversely Associated with Prevalent Coronary Heart Disease: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study. Clin Nutr. 2011 Apr;30(2):182–87.

Bloated portions bloat American’s waistlines

When was the last time you had a reasonably portioned meal at a restaurant? Food portions at restaurants these days seem to be intended to serve more than one. Some portion sizes have doubled and even tripled at American restaurants over the last 20 years leading to excess calorie consumption. And these distorted portion sizes are a significant contributor to the growing overweight and obesity epidemic in America.

According to the National, Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Obesity Education Initiative, in just over 20 years the average size bagel has more than doubled in size and calories. Likewise, your average plate of spaghetti and meatballs doubled in size and calories, now providing a whopping 1,025 calories per serving. During that same time period, soda servings have increased from an average of 6.5 ounces and 85 calories to 20 ounces and 250 calories. Is it any wonder that American’s waistlines are expanding as these bloated portions become the expectation for your typical meal?

The U.S. National Institutes of Health estimates that today’s excessive portions could easily lead to the consumption of an additional 500,000 calories per year. Those excess calories are a significant contributor to the rapidly increasing number of Americans who are overweight or obese — currently estimated to be two-thirds of Americans.

Fortunately, with the TransformWise approach to sensible portions, you can combat this trend of oversized portions and waistlines.

Each person is biologically unique with different calorie requirements — a 90-pound woman does not need the same amount of calories as a 225-pound man. That is why the TransformWise sensible portion approach relies on your hands as guide to determine reasonable portions.

  • Vegetables and fruits should make up the bulk of your diet, with a sensible portion being the size of your entire hand.
  • Wholesome carbohydrates should fit into your cupped hand.
  • Fats, preferably healthy fats, should be about the size of your thumb
  • And lean protein sources that cover your open palm is a reasonable portion of protein.

In addition, TransformWise advocates five to six smaller, metabolically balanced meals per day. The growing body of research suggests that eating five to six smaller meals and snacks per day offers myriad benefits, including better blood sugar control, balanced hormone levels, improved appetite control and increased thermogenesis — when your body uses excess calories to produce heat rather than storing them as fat.

For a more information and a complete guide to revealing your ideal physique and managing your weight, read TransformWise: Your Complete Guide to a Wise Body Transformation.

Essential Oil Safety Quiz

ESSENTIAL OIL SAFETY QUIZ

Put your essential oil safety knowledge to the test. Can you answer all six questions correctly? The answers are based on current evidence and our current understanding of essential oils. Then compare your results with your friends.

aroma-906137 (1)

Test your knowledge of the basic safety measured employed when using essential oils therapeutically. Be sure to invite your friends to test their knowledge as well.

1. True or False: Essential oils can regularly be used neat (without dilution in a carrier oil) on the skin.

 
 

2. True or False: It is safe to take some essential oils internally.

 
 

3. True or False: All essential oils are safe for children because they are natural.

 
 

4. True or False: Essential oils can be safely added to the eyes or ears if diluted well.

 
 

5.

True or False: Caution should be exercised when using essential oils during pregnancy, and some are best avoided entirely.

 
 

6. True of false: Essential oils labeled as therapeutic grade do not cause adverse reactions.

 
 


Single cheat meal causes diminished cardiovascular function

Many people allow themselves a “cheat meal,” or unhealthy meal, as a reward for reaching their fitness or health goals. Or they, may eat better during the week and lapse in those healthy eating habits over the weekend. Maybe it’s a holiday or party that destroys your eating plan. In fact, many nutritionists regard an occasional cheat meal as a beneficial practice when attempting to lose weight. What could one meal hurt anyway, right?

Well according to a 2012 study that single junk meal — with a significant portion of calories from saturated fat — harms your cardiovascular function immediately following the meal.(1) Specifically, cheat meals, or typical meals of the Standard American Diet (SAD), adversely affect vascular endothelium (the inner lining of blood vessels) function. Conversely, meals that more closely resemble the Mediterranean diet — rich in mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (like omega-3s) — may produce positive effects on vascular endothelium function.

Vascular endothelial function is one of the most significant predictors of and precursors to atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a common disorder characterized by the hardening, thickening or lossburger-1140824_1920 of elasticity of the arterial walls. It is caused by a buildup of fat, cholesterol and other substances that form plaque in the walls of the arteries. This buildup may eventually result in the blockage of the arteries, leading to a host of health problems including heart attack and stroke.

The lead author of the study, Dr. Anil Nigam, Director of Research and the Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation Centre (EPIC), and colleagues compared the effects of junk food meals to a typical Mediterranean meal. The Mediterranean diet has long been associated with a reduction in heart disease and atherosclerosis.

The study included 28 non-smoking men, who ate a Mediterranean meal (salmon, almonds, and vegetables cooked in olive oil) one week followed by a junk food meal (a sandwich with sausage, egg and cheese, and three hash browns) one week later. After each meal, the researchers measured endothelial function in response to the foods consumed.

Surprisingly, it took only one junk food meal for the researchers to observe a 24 percent decline in endothelial function among participants when compared to their baseline before meals. Participant’s endothelial function remained normal following the consumption of the Mediterranean meal. This is a remarkable finding and should provide a reason to pause before succumbing to that double cheeseburger and fries the next time you are tempted to cheat.

salmon-923964_1920The study authors also discovered that participants with higher blood triglyceride levels benefited more from the Mediterranean meal when compared to participants with low blood triglyceride levels. Their arteries responded better after eating the Mediterranean meal, which suggests that a single healthy meal may also provide dramatic benefits to the cardiovascular system.

What we learn from this research is that every meal matters and can contribute positively or negatively to our health. To discover more benefits of omega-3 fatty acids read pages 41-44 of The Doctor’s Guide to Surviving When Modern Medicine Fails. Eat better and feel better!

(1) Cantin J, Lacroix S, Tardif J, et al. Does the Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet Influence Baseline and Postprandial Endothelial Function? Canadian J Cardiology. 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):S245.

Give your children an edge in school with an omega-3 supplement

Most parents understand that success in school leads to success later in life, so they make every effort to ensure their children have a good experience in school. This leads to concerns about how well their child will connect with a new teacher, worry over homework assignments and projects, and anxiety about end of term grades. Parents may dream of a simple solution to give their children an edge in school, when according to Oxford researchers that edge may be found on a dinner plate.

It is well known that long-term dietary choices influence mental health and cognitive function, whether positively or negatively. And previous research suggests that intake of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids — found in marine life and algae — supports brain health and may help the body clear amyloid plaques associated with Alzheimer’s disease when taken with vitamin D.(1,2) Omega-3s are vital to reduce ADHD symptoms in children as well. Read all about it in Beating ADHD Naturally. Oxford researchers now suggest that omega-3s may increase concentration and learning ability among school-age children, and therefore their school success.(3)

The brain is composed of approximately 60 percent fat and to function optimally it must have a steady stream of healthy fats from the diet or through supplementation to incorporate into its cell membranes. The brain selectively allows specific fats to enter the brain, namely the omega-3 fat DHA and the omega-6 fat arachidonic acid (AA). Both DHA and Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are vital to brain function at the cellular level, reducing inflammation and oxidative damage and supporting brain cell structure and function. Interestingly, while AA is widely distributed throughout the brain, DHA is largely concentrated in the gray matter, where thinking takes place.

Oxford scientists investigated how omega-3 fatty acids influenced the behavior and learning of children in elementary school. Almost 500 children, aged seven to nine years, and from 74 different schools in Oxfordshire were included in the study. Children received 600 mg of DHA from algal oil (algae) or a placebo (taste and color matched corn/soybean oil). The source of DHA will make vegetarians happy being that people often think that the only source of DHA is through marine oil.

Blood samples were taken to determine blood omega-3 levels and parents reported their children’s diet to researchers. What researchers found was that the overwhelming majority — almost 90 percent — of children included in the study did not consume the recommended two portions of fish twice per week to maintain a healthy cardiovascular and immune system. This is not surprising considering many children do not like the taste of fish.

Blood analyses found that only 2.45 percent of total blood fatty acids were long-chain omega-3 fatty acids among children participating in the study, well below the minimum of four percent recommended by leading scientists to maintain optimum cardiovascular health in adults, and significantly lower than the optimal range of 8 to 12 percent.

The study authors found that blood omega-3 fatty acid levels consistently predicted a child’s behaviors and ability to learn. Higher blood levels of omega-3s were strongly associated with fewer behavioral problems, and better reading ability and memory. DHA and EPA are particularly important in young children during growth and development stages when the body uses these key nutrients to support brain structure and function.

This study validates previous studies by the same scientists, showing that higher omega-3 intake improves reading progress and behavior and benefits children with ADHD, Dyspraxia, Dyslexia and related conditions.(4) Children should be given a minimum of 600 mg of DHA daily based on the study results. Most algal oils provide from 100 to 300 mg per capsule, whereas fish oil provides from 120 to 500 mg DHA per capsule.

(1) McNamara RK, Carlson SE. Role of omega-3 fatty acids in brain development and function: potential implications for the pathogenesis and prevention of psychopathology. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2006 Oct-Nov;75(4-5):329-49.

(2) Fiala M, Mizwicki MT. Neuroprotective and immune effects of active forms of vitamin D3 and docosahexaenoic acid in Alzheimer disease patients. Functional Foods in Health and Disease. 2011;1(12):545–554.

(3) Richardson AJ, Burton JR, Sewell RP, et al. Docosahexaenoic acid for reading, cognition and behavior in children aged 7-9 years: a randomized, controlled trial (the DOLAB Study). PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e43909.

(4) Montgomery P, Burton JR, Sewell RP, et al. Low blood long chain omega-3 fatty acids in UK children are associated with poor cognitive performance and behavior: a cross-sectional analysis from the DOLAB study. PLoS One. 2013 Jun 24;8(6):e66697.

Movement throughout the day as good as going to the gym?

Gym memberships and activity climb sharply in January as thousands of people renew their commitment to exercise more regularly. Those who have been mainstays of the gym anticipate this and also know that most people will not continue to patronize the gym come February. If your one of those that can’t seem to stay committed to the gym, don’t worry, researchers at Oregon State University assert that even short periods of activity equaling 30 minutes of daily activity provides health benefits similar to longer workouts at the gym.(1)

It is well-known that regular physical activity enhances overall health and decreases the risk of a range of health conditions, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Currently, the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans established by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity weekly to achieve the greatest health benefits.

The OSU researchers evaluated the physical activity levels of more than 6,000 American adults who wore accelerometers to assess the extent of their daily activity. Participants in the cross-sectional study fell into one of two categories: 1) those that went to the gym to exercise and 2) those who increased their physical activity through short periods of movement — as short as one to two minutes each — through routine daily behaviors.

Remarkably, the study found that those who participated in short periods of physical activity achieved positive health outcomes similar to those who participated in a more structured exercise routine. These benefits included lower blood pressure, decreased cholesterol levels, diminished waist circumference and reduced risk of metabolic syndrome. In fact, the structured exercise group who met the physical activity guidelines for Americans had an 87 percent chance of not having metabolic syndrome compared to 89 percent among the short period group.

These findings, published in the American Journal of Health Promotion suggest that promoting movement as a way of life may significantly improve the health and quality of life among Americans who are living more sedentary lives generally. Indeed, as little as 15 minutes of daily activity has been shown to increase longevity.

Short periods of physical activity equivalent to 150 minutes weekly can easily be incorporated into most people’s daily routine. For example, you can go down or up a floor to use the restroom; walk to errands that are shorter than a mile; do calisthenics during commercials while watching TV or during a break at work; or pace while talking on the phone.

It doesn’t necessarily mean you can give up on the gym. Structured exercise is still beneficial and high-intensity exercise provides added benefits such as increased metabolism and accelerated fat burning (see TransformWise). But the findings do suggest that if you don’t want to make the time for 30 consecutive minutes of exercise you can achieve similar results by moving more throughout the day to equal 30 minutes’ total. The key is some physical activity is better than none —so get moving daily!

(1) Loprinzi PD, Cardinal BJ. Association between biologic outcomes and objectively measured physical activity accumulated in ≥ 10-minute bouts and <10-minute bouts. Am J Health Promot. 2013 Jan-Feb;27(3):143-51.